Tag Archives: demand planning

Managing the Inventory of Promoted Items

In a previous post, I discussed one of the thornier problems demand planners sometimes face: working with product demand data characterized by what statisticians call skewness—a situation that can necessitate costly inventory investments. This sort of problematic data is found in several different scenarios. In at least one, the combination of intermittent demand and very effective sales promotions, the problem lends itself to an effective solution. Continue reading

The Scourge of Skewness

Demand planners have to cope with multiple problems to get their job done. One is the Irritation of Intermittency. The “now you see it, now you don’t” character of intermittent demand, with its heavy mix of zero values, forces the use of advanced statistical methods, such as Smart Software’s patented Markov Bootstrap algorithm. But even within the dark realm of intermittent demand, there are degrees of difficulty: planners must further cope with the potentially costly Scourge of Skewness.
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Too Much or Too Little Inventory?

Gregory Hartunian Headshot

Smart Software President Gregory Hartunian

Do you know which items have too much or too little inventory? What if you knew? How would you go about cutting overstocks while still ensuring a competitive service level? Would you be able to reduce stockouts without incurring a prohibitively expensive inventory increase? How would these changes impact service levels, costs and turns—for individual items, groups of items and overall?

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Handling Extreme Supply Chain Variability at Rev-A-Shelf

Headshot of Rev-A-Shelf's John Engelhardt

John Engelhardt, Director of Purchasing and Asian Operations, Rev-A-Shelf

Does your extended supply chain suffer from extreme seasonal variability? Does this situation challenge your ability to meet service level commitments to your customers? I have grappled with this at Rev-A-Shelf, addressing unusual conditions created by Chinese New Year and other global events, and would like to share the experience and a few things I learned along the way.

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Truth in Forecasting—Practical Advice at Year’s End

Head shot of Turbide

Consultant Dave Turbide

At year’s end, we are often caught up in thinking and planning for the coming year. Did 2013 turn out the way you expected? Will 2014 be dramatically different? Are there other factors—things we are planning to do; things we think our competitors might do; outside forces like changing taste, demographics or economics—that might change the course of business in the coming year?

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Recommended Reading: Cloud Software Helps Overcome Budget Constraints

Smart Software recently announced a Software as a Service (SaaS) option for SmartForecastsSFCloud™. Premises-based perpetual licenses will continue to be the preferred software implementation method for many organizations, but there are many reasons why demand for cloud-based solutions is taking off. A vintage post by Bill Richardson at ApplicantStack Team Blog summarizes key benefits of the SaaS model.

Recommended Resource: ‘Practical Time Series Forecasting: A Hands-On Guide’, by Galit Schmueli

A readable, well-organized textbook could be invaluable to “help corporate forecasters-in-training understand the basics of time series forecasting,” as Tom Willemain notes in the conclusion to this review, originally published in Foresight: The International Journal of Applied Forecasting. Principally written for an academic audience, the review also serves inexperienced demand planning professionals by pointing them to an in-depth resource.

This neat little book aims to “introduce the reader to quantitative forecasting of time series in a practical, hands-on fashion.” For a certain kind of reader, it will doubtless succeed, and do so in a stylish way.

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Estimating Safety Stock

In my previous post in this series on essential concepts, “What is ‘A Good Forecast’”, I discussed the basic effort to discover the most likely future in a demand planning scenario. I defined a good forecast as one that is unbiased and as accurate as possible. But I also cautioned that, depending on the stability or volatility of the data we have to work with, there may still be some inaccuracy in even a good forecast. The key is to have an understanding of how much.

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Recommended Reading: Excellence in Demand Planning

In a recent post at SupplyChainBrain, Robert Bowman takes a look at excellence in demand planning. Focusing on admirable qualities and techniques, it should be an interesting read for any demand planner seeking to improve his or her craft.

What is “A Good Forecast”

Nelson Hartunian before a whiteboard

Smart Software President Nelson Hartunian, PhD

Tremendous cost-saving efficiencies can result from optimizing inventory stocking levels using the best predictions of future demand. Familiarity with forecasting basics is an important part of being effective with the software tools designed to exploit this efficiency. This concise introduction (the first in a short series of blog posts) offers the busy professional a primer in the basic ideas you need to bring to bear on forecasting. How do you evaluate your forecasting efforts, and how reliable are the results?

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